DEATHS

Clyde Oscar Oman Jr, 87

Born October 30, 1932

Died November 17, 2019

Caleesi Eden Mullens, 0

Born April 8, 2019

Died November 17, 2019

Eric D. Byrd, 46

Born December 11, 1972

Died November 15, 2019

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Our death notices and obits are always free to the families and funeral homes.

THINGS TO DO

Thursday, November 21

Future Soldier Training
Free Financial Seminar - Your Own Home
Whittier Gobble Giveaway
Book Discussion Events

Friday, November 22

Tai Chi for Better Balance
Gospel Music Celebration 19
Coffee with CASA
Save the Batfish: Trivia Night W/ LT. Gov Matt Pinnell
Pre-Black Friday Sales Event
Jake Tankersley
Fall Minis
Dynamo Show & Su Lluvia De Estrellas

Saturday, November 23

Pre-Black Friday Sales Event
Grand opening
Batfish Beer Release Pint Night!
Grand opening
Rockin' Christmas Auction

Monday, December 3, 2018, 8:37 AM

A semitrailer quietly left the former Sequoyah Fuels Corporation site near Gore this week, hauling away the last of 511 loads of nuclear waste that has plagued Sequoyah County and its citizens for decades.

The Cherokee Nation and Oklahoma attorney general’s office worked for 18 months to ensure the off-site disposal of 10,000 tons of radioactive material were removed from the Sequoyah Fuels site. The waste was transported to a disposal site in Utah where the uranium will be recycled and reused, leaving the area near the Arkansas River free of this nuclear waste for the first time in nearly 50 years.

“It is a historic day for the Cherokee Nation and the state of Oklahoma. Our lands are safe again, now that we have removed a risk that would have threatened our communities forever,” Cherokee Nation Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. said. “This would not have been possible if the tribe and state had not worked tirelessly together in court to ensure removal of this material.”

The uranium processing plant was opened by Kerr-McGee in 1970. It converted yellowcake uranium into fuel for nuclear reactors. The plant changed ownership more than once and was eventually sold to General Atomics under the name Sequoyah Fuels Corporation.

An accident at the plant killed one worker and injured dozens of others in 1986. Another accident in 1992 injured about three dozen workers. Following that accident and years of violating numerous environmental rules and nuclear safety standards, the plant was closed in 1993.

Tons of radioactive waste remained at the facility when it closed, so in 2004 the Cherokee Nation and state of Oklahoma entered into a settlement agreement that required the highest-risk waste be removed from the site. The owners of Sequoyah Fuels Corporation announced in 2016 their intention to bury the waste on site, but a judge forced the company to comply with the original agreement. Removal of the material is now complete.

“The Cherokee Nation has been in and out of court with Sequoyah Fuels since 2004, and now this material is no longer a ticking time bomb on the banks of the Arkansas River, one of our most precious natural resources,” Cherokee Nation Secretary of Natural Resources Sara Hill said. “Decommissioning this plant was never enough to satisfy our goals for a clean and safe environment. Removal of this highly contaminated waste was our goal, and we’re pleased that goal has finally been achieved.”

The plant is located where the Arkansas River and Illinois River meet.

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