DEATHS

Matthew Robert Elliott, 34

Born October 18, 1984

Died January 17, 2019

Alice Jean Ricketts-Culp, 91

Born July 15, 1927

Died January 16, 2019

Charlotte Jackson, 75

Born September 21, 1943

Died January 16, 2019

CLICK TO SEE MORE >>

Our death notices and obits are always free to the families and funeral homes.

THINGS TO DO

Sunday, January 20

Painting with Gwyn 3rd Sunday
Vision Board Workshop
Christian Life Class - Jonah - You Can't Outrun Grace

Monday, January 21

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. - Parade & Celebration
Georgia-Pacific Playground - Ribbon Cutting Celebration
Antioch, The Temple of Hope
MIN 4523: American Indian Ministry Internship 2019
PS Academy Oklahoma Real Estate Pre-Licensing Course
Semi-Annual Clearance Sale
Act Like Men Study - Don't Waste Your Life

Tuesday, January 22

The Real Okie Movie Night Presents, Pretty in Pink!
National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week®- Awareness Campaign
LiveLoveCycle Indoor Training
Semi-Annual Clearance Sale

Wednesday, October 31, 2018, 8:14 AM

Prisons bursting at the seams while running on skeleton crews have exacerbated problems inherent in housing inmates, according to Oklahoma Department of Corrections Director Joe Allbaugh. To deal with drugs, contraband, overcrowding and a justice system that keeps incarcerating people at a rate nearly unmatched in the nation and the world, the corrections department needs more money, he said.

The state Board of Corrections unanimously approved on Tuesday the Oklahoma Department of Corrections’ 2020 budget request from the State Legislature.

The $1.57-billion request includes $884 million to add 5,200 beds, $91.7 million for inmate hepatitis C treatment, $31.9 million for facility repairs, maintenance and critical needs, and $18.5 million for staff pay raises.

“This request is not a wish list,” Allbaugh said. “This is what we need. Oklahoma continues to send more people to prison, and it costs real money to house, look after, and provide those individuals medical care – all of which we are required to do.”

Tuesday’s vote took place during ODOC’s October board meeting at Northeastern Oklahoma Correctional Center in Vinita.

The request from the state’s fifth-largest agency (by appropriation) comes as it struggles with an inmate population expected to grow 2,367 inmates by 2026. As of Tuesday morning, 1,993 are housed in temporary beds, 975 sit in county jails, waiting to transfer to prison. State facilities were at 113 percent capacity Monday morning.

“We are bursting at the seams with over 27,000 inmates inside 24-facility system – and the state has made little progress on justice reform,” Allbaugh said. “As we’ve said before, reforms passed last session will help slow inmate population growth but do little to unseat Oklahoma as the world’s top incarcerator.”

https://muskogeenow.com/muskogeenow.png https://muskogeenow.com/prisons-request-15-billion-budget-a-billion-dollars-over-last-years-budget